Larry Summers

Lost Einsteins: What does it take to realize every child’s potential?

Lost Einsteins: What does it take to realize every child’s potential?

IN A KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY, our greatest natural resources are not pulled from the ground. They’re in the minds of our children. But while we have continued to invent clever new ways to extract natural capital, a recent report from the Equality of Opportunity Project makes the case that we’ve been less successful in tapping the potential of our students.

A capital victory

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Guest Post by CEO Steven Rothstein

I wish you could have been with me last week in our nation’s capital. I am so inspired by so many of the students, principals, corporate partners, and others who joined us there.

On Monday, we had a special briefing on key education and STEM issues at the White House. On Tuesday, we organized, with the partnership of many other groups and organizations, the first-ever Expanded Learning Summit: Meeting In The Middle. Many joined in person and hundreds more participated in the conversation via live stream or social media. Then on Wednesday, we continued the advocacy and momentum and brought students, educators, corporate partners and our team to Capitol Hill for meetings with 36 Democratic and Republican members in the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives on key education issues.

The summit was the first time a group of this scale – including more than 55 distinguished speakers and panelists – has convened to discuss how expanded learning can help close the opportunity gap for our nation’s young people. We had a range of thought leaders and policy makers participate, including our chairman, Dr. Larry Summers; the Mayor of Washington D.C.; Wendy Spencer; the Deputy Mayor of New York; a representative from the George Bush Center, and literally dozens of the “best and the brightest” in our field.

We were honored to receive a special message from President Obama himself. “Events like this summit,” he wrote, “bring together those of us working on the front lines to make better use of educational time… If our next generation is going to meet the challenges of this century, they will need more time in the classroom.”

We are deeply grateful to all of those who participated in the summit, and to the many supporters and convenors who made this event possible. They are all highlighted on our event website. We are committed to the thousands of children whom we serve, and to growing the field of expanded learning. We believe that last week’s activities were critical in advancing this agenda.

As we recognize our 20 years of service, the Expanded Learning Summit highlights how much more there is to do in our next phase. In the coming days, we’ll continue to share opportunities to engage with these important ideas, including archived video from all summit sessions.

Yours in service,

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CEO, Citizen Schools

P.S. We welcome your support to help more students across the country build the skills, access, and beliefs required for them to thrive as students and succeed as adults.

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PRESS RELEASE: Lawrence H. Summers Announces Steven Rothstein as CEO of Citizen Schools

CONTACT:  Holly Trippett, Citizen Schools, 301-452-3904, hollytrippett@citizenschools.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

LAWRENCE H. SUMMERS ANNOUNCES STEVEN ROTHSTEIN AS CEO OF CITIZEN SCHOOLS

May 22, 2014 – Boston, Mass. – Citizen Schools’ national Board Chair Lawrence H. Summers announced that the board has unanimously selected Steven Maze Rothstein as the organization's next Chief Executive Officer. Rothstein will join Citizen Schools August 1, 2014 as CEO-elect and will assume the CEO role on September 1, 2014. He will succeed Co-Founder and CEO Eric Schwarz, who led the organization for nearly 20 years. “At a time of growing inequality of opportunity, Citizen Schools has proven that expanded learning time significantly boosts academic proficiency,” said Summers. “Steven Rothstein is uniquely suited to continue the great work of Eric Schwarz. The board, the staff, and I are excited to work with Steven as we provide opportunities for academic success to all students.” Rothstein recently stepped down as President of The Perkins School for the Blind, where he served as President for 11 years. At Perkins, the nation’s first school for the blind, which counts Helen Keller among its alums, Rothstein grew in-person and online educational services from 40,000 to 850,000 students, parents, and teachers; completed a $136 million capital campaign, the largest in the school’s history; and grew annual operating revenue from $40 million to $72 million. Rothstein previously served as Co-Founder and General Manager of Citizens Energy Corporation, the world’s first nonprofit social mission oil company, increasing gross annual sales for Citizens and related companies to more than $2 billion. Citizens, which was Co-Founded and is now led by former Congressman Joe Kennedy, has provided free home heating oil to an estimated half a million elderly individuals and low-income families. Rothstein also served as Assistant Commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Mental Retardation from 1987 to 1990. The national board's appointment of Rothstein came at the unanimous recommendation of an eight member search committee chaired by Sherif Nada, a former Citizen Schools board chair, and including five board members, a major funder, and two members of the national staff. Search firm Isaacson Miller supported the search. “I am honored and humbled to join the Citizen Schools team,” said Rothstein. “The opportunity to work with smart people, volunteers, donors, supporters, and public officials to positively impact urban education is incredibly exhilarating. I am excited to continue the momentum that Eric and the team have built to impact thousands of students nationwide.” “Steven Rothstein is a innovative, experienced, and compassionate leader,” said Schwarz. “I look forward to supporting him and our excellent team during this transition. Citizen Schools has invented a new approach to education -- an approach that offers low-income children the extra academic practice, mentoring support, hands-on projects, and strong social networks needed to fully close opportunity and achievement gaps. Our results are strong, but now the challenge is scale. We need to make Citizen Schools the new normal in urban education.” Founded in Boston in 1995, Citizen Schools partners with underserved public middle schools across 14 school districts in seven states to dramatically expand the learning day by 400 hours each academic year. The organization mobilizes a team of AmeriCorps Teaching Fellows and volunteer “Citizen Teachers” who provide academic coaching and skill-building apprenticeships. Rigorous external evaluations indicate that Citizen Schools’ Expanded Learning Time (ELT) initiative significantly boosts academic proficiency, helps schools provide a well-rounded education, and more than doubles interest in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) through apprenticeships like robotics and video game design. A study of Citizen Schools students in Boston, MA and Charlotte, NC indicated that Citizen Schools helps students fully close high school completion and college access gaps with their middle income peers while also narrowing the college completion gap. Citizen Schools addresses a growing opportunity gap that is fueling growing inequality between lower and higher-income children in everything from test score proficiency to college graduation rates to lifelong earnings. A study by The Afterschool Corporation found that by the time children from low-income households reach 6th grade, their middle and upper-income peers spend 6,000 more hours engaged in formal and informal learning. Another study by educational economist Richard Murnane indicated that upper-income families have tripled their investment in their children’s education in a generation, while lower-income children have counted on resources from public schools. About Citizen Schools Citizen Schools is a national nonprofit organization that partners with middle schools to expand the learning day for children in low-income communities. Citizen Schools mobilizes a team of AmeriCorps educators and volunteer “Citizen Teachers” to teach real-world learning projects and provide academic support, in order to help all students discover and achieve their dreams. In the 2013-2014 academic year, the nonprofit served over 4,900 students and engaged 240 AmeriCorps Teaching Fellows and over 5,000 volunteer teachers. For more information, please visit http://www.citizenschools.org/.

Summers Announces Rothstein as CEO of Citizen Schools

Left to right: Larry Summer, Citizen Schools' national Board Chair, Emily McCann, President of Citizen Schools, Steven Rothstein, appointed CEO of Citizen Schools, and Eric Schwarz, Co-Founder and CEO of Citizen Schools Citizen Schools' national Board Chair Lawrence H. Summers announced that the board has unanimously selected Steven Maze Rothstein as the organization's next CEO. Rothstein will join Citizen Schools on August 1, 2014 as CEO-elect and will assume the CEO role on September 1, 2014, succeeding Co-Founder and CEO, Eric Schwarz. This story was featured in the Boston Business Journal this morning.

“At a time of growing inequality of opportunity, Citizen Schools has proven that expanded learning time significantly boosts academic proficiency,” said Summers. “Steven Rothstein is uniquely suited to continue the great work of Eric Schwarz. The board, the staff, and I are excited to work with Steven as we provide opportunities for academic success to all students.”

Rothstein recently stepped down as President of The Perkins School for the Blind, where he served as President for 11 years. At Perkins, the nation’s first school for the blind, which counts Helen Keller among its alums, Rothstein grew in-person and online educational services from 40,000 to 850,000 students, parents, and teachers; completed a $136 million capital campaign, the largest in the school’s history; and grew annual operating revenue from $40 million to $72 million. Rothstein previously served as Co-Founder and General Manager of Citizens Energy Corporation, the world’s first nonprofit social mission oil company, increasing gross annual sales for Citizens and related companies to more than $2 billion. Citizens, which was Co-Founded and is now led by former Congressman Joe Kennedy, has provided free home heating oil to an estimated half a million elderly individuals and low-income families. Rothstein also served as Assistant Commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Mental Retardation from 1987 to 1990.

The national board's appointment of Rothstein came at the unanimous recommendation of an eight member search committee chaired by Sherif Nada, a former Citizen Schools board chair, and including five board members, a major funder, and two members of the national staff. Search firm Isaacson Miller supported the search.

“I am honored and humbled to join the Citizen Schools team,” said Rothstein. “The opportunity to work with smart people, volunteers, donors, supporters, and public officials to positively impact urban education is incredibly exhilarating. I am excited to continue the momentum that Eric and the team have built to impact thousands of students nationwide.”

“Steven Rothstein is an innovative, experienced, and compassionate leader,” said Schwarz. “I look forward to supporting him and our excellent team during this transition. Citizen Schools has invented a new approach to education -- an approach that offers low-income children the extra academic practice, mentoring support, hands-on projects, and strong social networks needed to fully close opportunity and achievement gaps. Our results are strong, but now the challenge is scale. We need to make Citizen Schools the new normal in urban education.”

Founded in Boston in 1995, Citizen Schools partners with underserved public middle schools across 14 school districts in seven states to dramatically expand the learning day by 400 hours each academic year. The organization mobilizes a team of AmeriCorps Teaching Fellows and volunteer “Citizen Teachers” who provide academic coaching and skill-building apprenticeships. Rigorous external evaluations indicate that Citizen Schools’ Expanded Learning Time (ELT) initiative significantly boosts academic proficiency, helps schools provide a well-rounded education, and more than doubles interest in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) through apprenticeships like robotics and video game design. A study of Citizen Schools students in Boston, MA and Charlotte, NC indicated that Citizen Schools helps students fully close high school completion and college access gaps with their middle income peers while also narrowing the college completion gap.

Citizen Schools addresses a growing opportunity gap that is fueling growing inequality between lower and higher-income children in everything from test score proficiency to college graduation rates to lifelong earnings. A study by The Afterschool Corporation found that by the time children from low-income households reach 6th grade, their middle and upper-income peers spend 6,000 more hours engaged in formal and informal learning. Another study by educational economist Richard Murnane indicated that upper-income families have tripled their investment in their children’s education in a generation, while lower-income children have counted on resources from public schools.

Rothstein is moving to Somerville with his wife, Susan Maze Rothstein, a professor of law at Northeastern University. The couple has two sons. One is a doctor and the other is a student at Williams College. Rothstein was selected as a student member of the Massachusetts board of education while still in high school and later, as a parent in the Brookline public schools, served as chair of the Brookline Extended Day Program. Rothstein graduated with honors from Williams College and received a Master of Business Administration degree from Northeastern University through the school’s evening program.

Larry Summers Shares How Citizen Schools is a Solution

Eric Schwarz is the Co-Founder and CEO of Citizen Schools _dsc0930At a time of growing innovation but also growing inequality, Citizen Schools is poised to scale our impact with Larry Summers, President Emeritus at Harvard University and former Treasury Secretary of the United States, as our new national board chair. Summers has seen Citizen Schools up close through his work with the Dever-McCormack ELT school in Boston, where his daughter Ruth serves as an AmeriCorps Teaching Fellow, and at our annual WOW! Bowl flag football competition. He has a compelling capacity to explain our work in the context of history and economic trends.

On March 6, I was pleased to welcome business and finance leaders in New York City to hear Larry discuss education and the economy, and the key reasons why he believes Citizen Schools is a solution to our most pressing education challenges.

_dsc0911"I believe the battle for America's future, and its legitimacy, will be won or lost in its public schools," Summers said in his speech. "The approach being pioneered and driven by Citizen Schools is a remarkably effective approach, a remarkably scalable approach, and an approach consistent with the broad value of American society – that Americans are people who pitch in with a sense of community to solve problems."

To read Larry's full speech and learn more about his perspective on closing the opportunity gap click here.

CEO Eric Schwarz Welcomes Larry Summers as National Board Chair

Eric Schwarz is the CEO and Co-Founder of Citizen Schools. 

I am excited and proud to share the news that Larry Summers, the President Emeritus of Harvard University and former Treasury Secretary, has agreed to become our next board chair. Please check out the story from this morning's Boston Globe. Yesterday morning Larry spoke at a Citizen Schools breakfast event in Boston with prospective and current supporters. Larry began his talk by sharing, “I’m here because I care about equality of opportunity.” I have met Larry six times now over the last nine months and have been consistently impressed by his deep commitment to education, his intellect, and his desire to make a difference. Larry described inequality of opportunity based on family income in America as “unacceptable.” He said rethinking our educational system in order to close this gap is an urgent national challenge. I couldn't agree more.

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During his talk, Larry recalled a story from his time as Secretary of the Treasury of the United States. The event has, in his words, “haunted” him ever since. In his role, Larry would often visit cities across the country to meet with the local Treasury departments and finance leaders. On every trip he insisted on stopping by a public school in the city. Sometimes he would teach a short class on economics or speak to members of teaching staff, always trying to learn more and share more.

It was a trip to an inner-city school in Oakland that still sticks with him today.He had just finished giving the students a speech about the importance of education and was feeling very good about it, when he was approached by a teacher. She congratulated him on the speech, but then asked how her students were supposed to believe him when the school's walls were completely chipped away and hadn't been painted in 18 years. She asked him how the students could believe him when they got nauseous during dissections in science class because the ventilation system was broken. He didn't have an answer for her.

We are not the whole answer to the question of how low-income students in under-resourced schools can have the same opportunities as their more privileged peers. But I believe that Citizen Schools can be a very important part of the answer  And I know Larry Summers does too.

I am lucky to have partnered deeply with a great founding chair -- Marsha Feinberg -- who was then joined by a terrific co-chair in the early years, Shashi Rajpal. Over the last 13 years Sherif Nada and then Andrew Balson have been terrific partners as board leaders as we have established ourselves as national leaders in education reform. I believe Larry Summers will bring a wealth of connections and insight and a deep commitment to education as a driver of shared economic prosperity. With all of our partnership, he can help lead us to an ever-greater position of influence and impact on behalf of low-income children across the country.

Please see the list of our current board members below.In his talk, Larry shared the “unacceptable” fact that by the time they reach middle school, children from middle and upper income families have received 6,000 more hours of learning time than their low-income peers. This time comes from things like more summer programs, more time with parents, more out-of-school enrichment and additional access to pre-school programs.

Larry, one of the country’s most brilliant economic minds, noted that this opportunity gap and consequent achievement gap, is not just a social justice issue – it is an economic issue that threatens the continued prosperity of every citizen. In America today, for both the affluent and the impoverished, parental wealth now predicts adult success more than at any point in over 100 years. Larry believes that Citizen Schools can help reverse this dangerous trendline and he is excited to help us work towards our vision of closing opportunity and achievement gaps. I am honored that he is joining us in this mission.

Over the past 18 years we've grown from an after-school program in Boston, to a nationally respected expanded learning day model in twelve districts in seven states. Now we are trying to take the next step and turn a growing set of proof points into a definitive case for how to transform low-income middle schools. Larry is in a unique position to help guide and support us as we make our case.

We have an opportunity to present the country with a model that can transform a low-income, poor-performing public middle school into a high-performing, high-opportunity change agent. That's a powerful opportunity. With continued dedication and our growing community of champions, which now includes Larry Summers, I believe we can seize it.

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Current board members:

  • Andrew Balson (Board chair) - Managing Director, Bain Capital
  • Larry Summers (Board chair-elect) - Charles W. Eliot University Professor and President Emeritus, Harvard University
  • Rob Dickey - Executive Vice President, Leggat McCall Properties
  • Peter Gorman – Senior Vice President, Amplify Education
  • Tripp Jones – Managing Director, New Profit Inc.
  • Sherif Nada (Past board chair) – Retired President, Fidelity Investments
  • Rosemary Reilly (Clerk, non-voting member) - Partner, WilmerHale
  • Ned Rimer (Citizen Schools Co-founder) – Co-Founder & CEO, Ithaka, LLC
  • Steven Schwartz – Senior Vice President and General Counsel, Cognizant Technology Solutions
  • Eric Schwarz – Co-founder & CEO, Citizen Schools
  • Susan Siebert (incoming board member) – Partner, Jones Day
  • Edward Skloot – Former Director, Center for Strategic Philanthropy of Duke University
  • Sanjeev Verma – Co-founder and Executive Vice President, Airvana
  • Omar Wasow – Assistant Professor, Princeton University
  • Lynn Wiatrowski – Executive Vice President, Bank of America Merrill Lynch